SMA - goodentree

keeping SMA healthy

Keeping SMA Healthy

How do we survive sick season?

No, people probably aren’t going to like it and, yes, they are probably going to fight you the whole way

The CDC says that cold and flu season PEAKS in November and goes through April. However, for SMA families the preparation begins long before that. We can’t wait until there is a sickness already upon us because by that time it may be too late. So we prepare. We prepare to become anti-social hermits, all to save the lives of the children we love so dearly. Whereas you can control who will socially enter our home, such as friends and family members, what do you do about those that are directly involved in the care of your child, i.e. therapists and nurses? There is a process that will help insure that your child will be exposed to as little potential for infection as possible.

SMA Carrier Testing

SMA Carrier Testing

Spinal Muscular Atrophy is a genetic disease.  It's something you're born with, it's not something you catch.

Certain people carry the potential for the disease - these are called carriers.  Carriers do not have the disease themselves but are the building blocks to create a child with SMA.  If two carriers,

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What is SMA?

What is SMA?

Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a motor neuron disease. The motor neurons affect the voluntary muscles that are used for activities such as crawling, walking, head and neck control, and swallowing.

It is a relatively common "rare disorder": approximately 1 in 6000 babies born are affected, and about 1 in 40 people are genetic carriers.

SMA affects muscles throughout the body, although the proximal muscles (those closest to the trunk of one’s body - i.e. shoulders, hips, and back) are often most severely affected. Weakness in the legs is generally greater than in the arms. Sometimes feeding and swallowing can be affected. Involvement of respiratory muscles (muscles involved in breathing and coughing) can lead to an increased tendency for pneumonia and other lung problems. Sensation and the ability to feel are not affected. Intellectual activity is normal, and it is often observed that patients with SMA are unusually bright and sociable. Patients are generally grouped into one of four categories. The determination of the type of SMA is based upon the physical milestones achieved. It is important to note that the course of the disease may be different for each child.